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AYSO26 Newsletter, July 14, 2009

posted Mar 25, 2010, 4:26 PM by AYSO26 Regional Commissioner   [ updated Mar 25, 2010, 4:27 PM ]
Parents:
 
Team formation has started and we hope to have the process completed within another week or so.  Team formation is a very difficult process and as one can imagine, it is impossible to please everyone with the team that their child is on.  Please keep in mind that the division commissioners are volunteers and that they do the best job they can.  AYSO philosophy does require us to attempt to balance teams which is why we have players from different schools on each team.  Everyone wants their practice field to be the one that is closest to their home, but in many cases that is not possible.  There are many more teams in north Palo Alto than there are field slots.  With all of this in mind, I ask that you accept your child�fs team placement when it comes out.  If you request that your child be placed on a different team, the consequence will be that your child will then be placed on the wait-list with a chance that they may not get on to another team.
 
With the exception of the kinder league, all divisions practice twice per week.  Divisions U7 through U14 have their games on Saturdays, while U16 and U19  have their games on Sundays.  Game times can start anytime from 8 AM through 3 PM.  The first game will be the first weekend after Labor Day weekend.
 
Most coaches if not all, we start the season with two practices per week.  Practices usually last one hour but the actual duration and start time is up to the coach.  Once daylight savings time starts, many coaches (especially in the younger divisions) will move to one practice per week.  Practices will start earlier as they must be completed before it gets dark.
 
We are still looking for more players in B19 and G19.  If your child is in B19 or G19 and knows someone who wants to play, let them know that there is still space on the teams.
 
If your daughter is entering G10 or G12, we still need coaches.  The more coaches we have, the more teams we can form and so the more kids can play.  Please consider stepping up to coach or co-coach.  Training is provided.
 
For those of you still looking for a summer camp for your child, we still have openings for our soccer camps.  Please visit http://www.ayso26.org and check out the links for summer camps.  We are offering two vendors this year:  UK Soccer Camps and Challenger Soccer Camps.  All camps are held at Greer Park.  Both half day and full days are available.
 
If you have signed up to be a ref or are considering being a ref, check out the referee pages on our web-site.  On the left hand-side of the page, is a link for Referees.  From there you can access the course schedule for referee training.
 
For those of you that are new to AYSO or just want a bit of information on how your division works, here is a brief explanation:
 
 
What to expect in U7 and U8
 
GAME FORMAT in U7 and U8
 
Boys and Girls Under-7 and Under-8 (6 and 7 year olds) play their games 4 to a side, with 10 players on the roster. For the Saturday games, each team divides into two "mini-teams" and plays the other team's "mini-teams". This format was piloted in 1998 and 1999 and has been a regular part of the
program since 2000.  There are NO keepers in U7 and U8.
 
Why? This is part of a trend within AYSO and elsewhere to match the game format to the age and development level of the children. Our region has emphasized the small-sided game as a teaching system in the youth coaching clinics in recent years. Coaches who have used the system at practices have
reported great success and an enthusiastic response from the kids. The following observations motivate this format.
 
    * Young children learn the essentials of the game better in small-sided games.
    * With small-sided games children have more opportunity to participate.
    * With smaller numbers there is more time and space for players to practice basic skills.
    * 4-a-side provides the basic elements of soccer without the  complications of positional play that is required in larger-sided games.
    * 4-a-side provides more playing time than former larger teams and a simpler substitution pattern.
 
How Does It Work?
 
    * Each team divides into two mini-teams of 5. There are 4 players on the field at a time and one substitute. Games are played without a designated goalkeeper, which tends to make for a high scoring game with lots of exciting shots on goal.
    * On odd numbered weeks the teams are evenly balanced. Each mini-team plays both of the opposing team's mini-teams Each game is 20 minutes, with a 2 minute substitution break at the half. There is a 5 minute interval between the two games.
    * On even numbered weeks, coaches divide the roster into one mini-team of the stronger players and one mini-team of the weaker players, called "World Cup" and "Olympic", respectively. Each mini-team then plays a single full-length game against their opponents, that is World Cup versus World Cup and Olympic versus Olympic. The aim is provide more balanced competition, especially for the weaker players on the roster, who often struggle to get involved in a game when strong players are in the same game.
    * Everybody rotates and takes a turn at goal each week.
 
On any given game day the players do not switch between mini-teams, but the makeup of the two mini-teams will likely vary from week to week. 
 
REFEREES
 
Each of the two mini games needs one referee. We ask that each team provide two referees. Only one from each team is needed each week, but we like to have 2 trained referees in case one is absent. Games are "self-assigned", meaning the referees at the game will decide who will referee each
mini game. Referees must attend a 3 hour clinic to be properly certified at this level. If you are already certified, a refresher clinic is strongly recommended. Clinic information can be found at
 
http://ayso26.org/ref/clinics.html.
 
 
BODY PIERCINGS
 
As mandated in the FIFA Laws of the Game used worldwide, no player may wear anything considered dangerous to themselves or any other player. This includes all jewelry. We run into problems every year with players with newly
pierced ears who do not want to remove the studs. Referees are instructed not to let them play unless they remove them; covering them with tape is *not* an option. The best solution
- wait until the end of the season to get the piercings.
 
 
What to expect in U9
 
GAME FORMAT in U9
 
The game format in U9 is similar to U7 and U8 (see http://ayso26.org/divisions.html#U9), except that the two mini games are played on slightly larger fields with 5-a-side. There are ideally 12 players on the roster.
 
For the Saturday games, each team divides into two "mini-teams" and plays the other team's "mini-teams". This format was piloted in 1998 and 1999 and has been a regular part of the program since 2000.
 
How Does It Work?
 
    * Each team divides into two mini-teams of 6. There are 5 players on the field at a time, including a goalkeeper, and one substitute.
    * On odd numbered weeks the teams are evenly balanced. Each mini-team plays both of the opposing team's mini-teams Each game is 25 minutes, with a 2 minute substitution break at the half. There is a 5 minute interval between the two games.
    * On even numbered weeks, coaches divide the roster into one mini-team of the stronger players and one mini-team of the weaker players, called "World Cup" and "Olympic", respectively. Each mini-team then plays a single full-length game against their opponents, that is World Cup versus World Cup and Olympic versus Olympic. The aim is provide more balanced competition, especially for the weaker players on the roster, who often struggle to get involved in a game when strong players are in the same game.
    * Everybody rotates and takes a turn at goal each week.
 
On any given game day the players do not switch between mini-teams, but the makeup of the two mini-teams will likely vary from week to week.
 
REFEREES
 
Each of the two mini games needs one referee. We ask that each team provide two referees. Only one from each team is needed each week, but we like to have 2 trained referees in case one is absent. Games are "self-assigned", meaning the referees at the game will decide who will referee each mini game. Referees must attend a 3 hour clinic to be properly certified at this level. If you are already certified, a refresher clinic is strongly recommended.
Clinic information can be found at
 
http://ayso26.org/ref/clinics.html.
 
 
BODY PIERCINGS
 
As mandated in the FIFA Laws of the Game used worldwide, no player may wear anything considered dangerous to themselves or any other player. This includes all jewelry. We run into problems every year with players with newly pierced ears who do not want to remove the studs. Referees are instructed not to let them play unless they remove them; covering them with tape is *not* an option. The best solution
- wait until the end of the season to get the piercings.
 
 
What to expect in U10
 
GAME FORMAT in U10
 
U10 is a big step up from U9, as we move from using laws of the game that are substantially modified for the younger children, to the standard laws of the game, with slight modifications due to the reduction in field and goal size
(yes, we use the offside law in this division!). The games are played 7-a-side with rosters of 10 players.
 
REFEREES
 
We use the standard diagonal system of refereeing in this division, with three referees. Referees are parent volunteers from the teams playing. The home team must provide a trained center referee. (Failure to do so means the home team forfeits the game.) The two assistant referees who work the sidelines may come from either team; it is therefore recommended that each team have at least two trained referees. Under-10 Rules and refereeing are described in more detail in the Referee section of our web site, Under-10 Rules page (see http://ayso26.org/ref/d5regs.html).
At this level, referees must take the Basic Referee class. Referee training from U9 is *not* adequate for this level! The class schedule can be found at
http://ayso26.org/ref/clinics.html.
 
BODY PIERCINGS
 
As mandated in the FIFA Laws of the Game used worldwide, no player may wear anything considered dangerous to themselves or any other player. This includes all jewelry. We run into problems every year with players with newly
pierced ears who do not want to remove the studs. Referees are instructed not to let them play unless they remove them; covering them with tape is *not* an option. The best solution
- wait until the end of the season to get the piercings.
 
 
What to expect in U12
 
GAME FORMAT in U12
 
The game format in U12 is essentially the same as U10, with the full laws of the game. The main difference is that the games are played with 9 to a side, with rosters of 12. The U12 fields are full size.
 
REFEREES
 
There is a major change in the way referees are assigned in the U12 division. Parents are no longer allowed to be the center referee for their own child's game. Parent referees may be assistant referees, however, for their own child's game for any age group.
 
Since parents are no longer allowed to be center referee for their own child's game, we expect the referees to help out by refereeing games their children are not involved in. We depend on this, otherwise we would not have any referees**! The referees are assigned to games by a scheduler. The
scheduler will typically assign a referee to be the center referee to a game before or after their child's game, and then assign them as assistant referee to their child's game. Referees are asked to input their preferences into the WYS system at the beginning of the season (how many games per day, centers or lines, days available, which divisions), and the scheduler uses this information to make compatible assignments.
 
Referees at this level are expected to have at least the Basic Referee training, and at a minimum attend a refresher clinic each year. Referees who have had at least a year of experience at this level are encouraged to attend the Intermediate Referee course. Clinic information can be found at
 
http://ayso26.org/ref/clinics.html.
 
 
**People ask each year why we can't simply bring in other referees and pay them. The problem is - there aren't any! Most referees in Palo Alto started out in AYSO. The ones working for other clubs are over-worked, and, indeed, many of the experienced referees in AYSO also help out with the other clubs because there is such a chronic shortage of referees. Besides which, AYSO is an all-volunteer organization and paying referees would violate AYSO National regulations. AYSO has to be self-sufficient regarding referees, or the program just won't work.
 
BODY PIERCINGS
 
As mandated in the FIFA Laws of the Game used worldwide, no player may wear anything considered dangerous to themselves or any other player. This includes all jewelry. We run into problems every year with players with newly
pierced ears who do not want to remove the studs. Referees are instructed not to let them play unless they remove them; covering them with tape is *not* an option. The best solution
- wait until the end of the season to get the piercings.
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